Friday, December 12, 2008

Roger Linden Interview on nonduality



More parts to the interview here.

There's also a good interview with Tony Parsons.

I'm still trying to understand why A Course In Miracles says that you can work towards enlightenment (a no-self state) and all those other teachers claim very definitely that you can't, it just happens when it happens. Strange.

8 comments:

Pol O said...

I think Eolake, that the further you get in ACIM (working towards enlightenement)the more you come to realise that you are already there. There is, I think, no WAY that does not lead to ONE, because that is all there IS

eolake said...

Fair enough.

Pol O said...

if ultimate reality doesn't change...
and silence never changes...

can one teach silence?

neeraj said...

As a metaphor, it is like going to sleep:

Maybe it is not a 100 % "must", but mostly it is very helpful to prepare your bed, to take off your clothes, and so on ... but then, falling into sleep happens by itself, when you let go.

(Of course you may fall into sleep without big preparation, if you are tired enough.)

Or, another metaphor: To put an arrow into goal, you have to aim at the target and to stretch the bow, then you have to let go ...

So, in a way it is the one as well as the other - the real question is: What is more helpful for you in your actual situation?

eolake said...

Thanks.

neeraj said...

Just another metaphor (there are many):

Ego is like a "cramp of your brain muscles" - to get rid of it you have to move the "muscles", to massage and to shake them, to go into activity (there are many possibilities, many of them using the body as a stepping stone) - and then you are able to relax and to let go ...

Maybe you have heard about the "Active Meditations" by Osho? (e.g. http://www.osho.com/Main.cfm?Area=Meditation&Language=English, javascript needed)

I know it works.

eolake said...

Funny, I mentioned my own theory to Roger on the phone last week, that mental pain is like a cramping muscle.
I doubt it goes as deep as the Ego itself though.

What he taught me was (further) about how to be still and relax and let the pain be, and it goes away.
And he actually said he's done it with a muscle cramp too, one day he could not move to handle it.

neeraj said...

Sometimes I think it is like a tree:

Roots = the basic fear of the dark abyss of dissolving into nothingness (mostly felt as fear of death, or also fear of going deep into love);

tree trunk = ego;

all branches and leaves = all kinds of big and small mental sufferings and pain.

To let the pain be, simply watching it consciously, thats basically meditation. But it is easier to start with watching consciously sweet experiences, or daily experiences without a big mental load ...